How to become a Radio Amateur in the UK

Kenwood TMV-71E

How do I become a radio amateur?
The best way to start is by listening to other amateurs on any of the amateur bands—frequencies reserved for use by radio amateurs. Try 3.5MHz upwards, or 7MHz upwards for starters. There are ways of doing this even if you have no receiving equipment—see below. Listen to what’s being said, listen to how it’s done and imagine yourself in that place.
For a full list of amateur frequencies in the UK see Band Plans and Information.
If you like what you hear, and would like to become a member of of that community, then you can join the RSGB (Radio Society of Great Britain) as a listener, and receive the monthly magazine RadCom, which keeps you abreast of what’s happening in the world of amateur radio and is full of ideas, tips and useful information. You can then start thinking about getting a licence yourself. It’s easy, and you will find lots of other amateurs only too willing to help you on your way—that’s part of the ethos of being a radio amateur. You can find out more about getting a transmitting licence in the FAQs to follow or by visiting Training.

Paul Leicester | MØFOX | Chesterfield UK | IO93HE | Icom IC-7300

amateur ham radio uk

Amateur radio (also called ham radio) is the use of designated radio frequency spectra for purposes of private recreation, non-commercial exchange of messages, wireless experimentation, self-training, and emergency communication. The term “amateur” is used to specify persons interested in radio technique solely with a personal aim and without direct monetary or other similar reward, and to differentiate it from commercial broadcasting, public safety (such as police and fire), or professional two-way radio services (such as maritime, aviation, taxis, etc.).

The amateur radio service (amateur service and amateur satellite service) is established by the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) through the International Telecommunication Regulations. National governments regulate technical and operational characteristics of transmissions and issue individual stations licenses with an identifying call sign. Prospective amateur operators are tested for their understanding of key concepts in electronics and the host government’s radio regulations. Radio amateurs use a variety of voice, text, image, and data communications modes and have access to frequency allocations throughout the RF spectrum to enable communication across a city, region, country, continent, the world, or even into space.

Amateur radio is officially represented and coordinated by the International Amateur Radio Union (IARU), which is organized in three regions and has as its members the national amateur radio societies which exist in most countries. According to an estimate made in 2011 by the American Radio Relay League, two million people throughout the world are regularly involved with amateur radio.[1] About 830,000 amateur radio stations are located in IARU Region 2 (the Americas) followed by IARU Region 3 (South and East Asia and the Pacific Ocean) with about 750,000 stations. A significantly smaller number, about 400,000, are located in IARU Region 1 (Europe, Middle East, CIS, Africa).

Paul Leicester | MØFOX | Chesterfield UK | IO93HE | Icom IC-7300

Icom IC7610 Ham Radio Deluxe Settings

Correct settings to enable connection to the HRD software.

CI-v Echo back ==ON
CI-v usb baud rate == 9600
CI-v usb Port ==Unlink
CI-v address == 7A (This is the CI-V address for the 7600)
CI-V Tranceive == OFF
CI-v baud rate ==9600
Decode baud rate == 9600
Data off mod == mic,acc
Data 1 mod ==usb
Data 2 mod ==usb
Data 3 ==mic,acc
Set the com port to “Auto Detect” and the port speed to 9600.

Change CI-V address to 7A (7600 CI-V address)

click the “Connect” button and the wait till HRD locates the correct com port and it should connect successfully.

Paul Leicester | MØFOX | Chesterfield UK | IO93HE | Icom IC-7300