MØFOX UK Ham Radio

MØFOX Amateur Radio Website – Paul Leicester

Amateur radio (also called ham radio) is the use of designated radio frequency spectra for purposes of private recreation, non-commercial exchange of messages, wireless experimentation, self-training, and emergency communication. The term “amateur” is used to specify persons interested in radio technique solely with a personal aim and without direct monetary or other similar reward, and to differentiate it from commercial broadcasting, public safety (such as police and fire), or professional two-way radio services (such as maritime, aviation, taxis, etc.).

The amateur radio service (amateur service and amateur satellite service) is established by the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) through the International Telecommunication Regulations. National governments regulate technical and operational characteristics of transmissions and issue individual stations licenses with an identifying call sign. Prospective amateur operators are tested for their understanding of key concepts in electronics and the host government’s radio regulations. Radio amateurs use a variety of voice, text, image, and data communications modes and have access to frequency allocations throughout the RF spectrum to enable communication across a city, region, country, continent, the world, or even into space.

Amateur radio is officially represented and coordinated by the International Amateur Radio Union (IARU), which is organized in three regions and has as its members the national amateur radio societies which exist in most countries. According to an estimate made in 2011 by the American Radio Relay League, two million people throughout the world are regularly involved with amateur radio.[1] About 830,000 amateur radio stations are located in IARU Region 2 (the Americas) followed by IARU Region 3 (South and East Asia and the Pacific Ocean) with about 750,000 stations. A significantly smaller number, about 400,000, are located in IARU Region 1 (Europe, Middle East, CIS, Africa).


M0FOX UK Ham Radio
little-foxie

Paul Leicester | MØFOX | Chesterfield UK | IO93HE | Icom IC-7300

UR6QW 8-band Equalizer with compressor, low noise preamp

UR6QW noise gate

8-band Equalizer with compressor, low noise preamp,  Echo effect processor and Noise Gate to transceiver V.5

UR6QW make special device for Ham Amateur Radio. We make PCB and  complete constructions in metal housing. We make pinouts for many transceiver model, but if you need special order

Technical data:

 Microphone low noise amplifier with input and output level pots.

Echo prosessor with regulation of delay.

Slanted front panel for more comfortable operation with it.

 Voice 8 band Equalizer with pots on 80 / 160/ 250 / 500 / 900 / 1500 / 2500 / 3200 Hz.

Strong steel case – reliable protection against external noises.

Good workig with HIGH OUTPUT POWER up to 2kWt.

Working UP DOWN control of the radio by Mic’s knobs.

Has add mic input MINI-JACK for easy use of computer typeface, HEIL microphones and etc.

 Overload level led

 Compressor ratio pot

Dimensions 180mmx100mmx75mm (with knobs)

 Weight – 0.68 kg

 Length of a power cord with 8 pin connector is 30 cm (optional, IC7300 – 50cm)

Knobs color can be change.

 

         Pinouts: We can make device pinouts for any transceiver model (RJ-45, 8pole, 4pole and other). Descriptions please you model when you pay or email

 

       Shipping: We ship Worldwide from the Ukraine by Airmail with tracking number (that can be easily tracked through the Internet).

https://ur6qw.jimdo.com

Paul Leicester | MØFOX | Chesterfield UK | IO93HE | Icom IC-7300

Beyond FT8 – That would be FT4

AS RELEASED by Dr JH Taylor K1JT and Team, Steve (K9AN), and Bill (G4WJS) https://physics.princeton.edu/pulsar/…http://physics.princeton.edu/pulsar/k… “Soon after the “FT8 Roundup” held on December 1-2, 2018, we started serious work on a faster, more contest-friendly digital mode that can compete with RTTY-contesting QSO rates while preserving many of the benefits of FT8. The result is FT4 — a new digital mode specifically designed for radio contesting. Over the past month a small group of volunteers have been conducting on-the-air tests of FT4. The early tests were very successful and helped us to make a number of important design decisions. We believe FT4 has considerable promise for its intended purpose. We’ll soon be ready for testing by a larger group. If you might be interested in participating and offering your considered feedback, please read the descriptive document “The FT4 Protocol for Digital Contesting”, posted here: http://physics.princeton.edu/pulsar/k… We plan to post downloadable installation packages for WSJT-X 2.1.0-rc5 on April 29, one week from today. The document linked above includes – Instructions for installing WSJT-X 2.1.0-rc5 and FT4 configuration – Operating instructions for FT4 – Basic description of the FT4 protocol, modulation, and waveform – Detailed sensitivity measurements for FT4 under a wide variety of simulated propagation conditions – Schedule for upcoming test sessions Please consider helping us to make FT4 a successful mode for digital contesting With best wishes and 73, — Joe (K1JT), Steve (K9AN), and Bill (G4WJS)”

Paul Leicester | MØFOX | Chesterfield UK | IO93HE | Icom IC-7300

SharkRF openSPOT2

The openSPOT2 is a standalone digital radio internet gateway (hotspot) designed mainly for amateur radio. You can talk with others on digital radio networks by using an openSPOT2, Wi-Fi internet access, and your radio.

Compatible digital radio protocols and networks*
DMR (BrandMeister, DMRplus, DMR-MARC, Phoenix, XLX)
D-STAR (DCS, REF/DPlus, XRF/DExtra, XLX)
System Fusion/C4FM (FCS, YSFReflector)
NXDN (NXDNReflector)
P25 (P25Reflector)
POCSAG (DAPNET)
Supports cross modem modes (example: talk with your C4FM radio on DMR, and with your DMR radio on System Fusion networks).

* NXDNReflector, POCSAG and P25 support will be added in a later firmware upgrade (soon). More supported networks and features will be available with new firmware releases.Paul Leicester | MØFOX | Chesterfield UK | IO93HE | Icom IC-7300

How to become a Radio Amateur in the UK

Kenwood TMV-71E

How do I become a radio amateur?
The best way to start is by listening to other amateurs on any of the amateur bands—frequencies reserved for use by radio amateurs. Try 3.5MHz upwards, or 7MHz upwards for starters. There are ways of doing this even if you have no receiving equipment—see below. Listen to what’s being said, listen to how it’s done and imagine yourself in that place.
For a full list of amateur frequencies in the UK see Band Plans and Information.
If you like what you hear, and would like to become a member of of that community, then you can join the RSGB (Radio Society of Great Britain) as a listener, and receive the monthly magazine RadCom, which keeps you abreast of what’s happening in the world of amateur radio and is full of ideas, tips and useful information. You can then start thinking about getting a licence yourself. It’s easy, and you will find lots of other amateurs only too willing to help you on your way—that’s part of the ethos of being a radio amateur. You can find out more about getting a transmitting licence in the FAQs to follow or by visiting Training.Paul Leicester | MØFOX | Chesterfield UK | IO93HE | Icom IC-7300

amateur ham radio uk

Amateur radio (also called ham radio) is the use of designated radio frequency spectra for purposes of private recreation, non-commercial exchange of messages, wireless experimentation, self-training, and emergency communication. The term “amateur” is used to specify persons interested in radio technique solely with a personal aim and without direct monetary or other similar reward, and to differentiate it from commercial broadcasting, public safety (such as police and fire), or professional two-way radio services (such as maritime, aviation, taxis, etc.).

The amateur radio service (amateur service and amateur satellite service) is established by the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) through the International Telecommunication Regulations. National governments regulate technical and operational characteristics of transmissions and issue individual stations licenses with an identifying call sign. Prospective amateur operators are tested for their understanding of key concepts in electronics and the host government’s radio regulations. Radio amateurs use a variety of voice, text, image, and data communications modes and have access to frequency allocations throughout the RF spectrum to enable communication across a city, region, country, continent, the world, or even into space.

Amateur radio is officially represented and coordinated by the International Amateur Radio Union (IARU), which is organized in three regions and has as its members the national amateur radio societies which exist in most countries. According to an estimate made in 2011 by the American Radio Relay League, two million people throughout the world are regularly involved with amateur radio.[1] About 830,000 amateur radio stations are located in IARU Region 2 (the Americas) followed by IARU Region 3 (South and East Asia and the Pacific Ocean) with about 750,000 stations. A significantly smaller number, about 400,000, are located in IARU Region 1 (Europe, Middle East, CIS, Africa).Paul Leicester | MØFOX | Chesterfield UK | IO93HE | Icom IC-7300